The cost of a game – 100 years ago

December 8th, 2013

Winter is coming and it’s during these darker days that I like to read more literary baseball prose, for that pleasure I always have a few Roger Angell books laying around for quick perusals. His work “Season Ticket” provides a wonderful tidbit about an older baseball fan… something we’ll all be one day. This piece gives great detail into the world of one hundred years ago and allows us to look into the world of 1913 big league ball.

We find the letter in the chapter titled, Top Missouri.

Back in June I received a stimulating letter from a 92 year old baseball fan named Joe Ryan, of Yountville California. Who write to tell me about a trip he made to New York City in October of 1913 to take in the opening game of the 1913 World Series between the Giants and the Philadelphia Athletics. He was twenty years old that fall and was working at an insurance firm in Hartford, at a salary of fifteen dollars per week., but he a colleague named Dave were Giant fanatics and impulsively determined to attend the classic. Mr. Ryan’s letter was wonderfully precise, conveying not only the news of the sport, but a careful accounting of every penny disbursed during the long ago two-day outing.

  • Railroad fares for two – $4.40
  • Room at Mills Hotel
  • $0.80 (2 nights at $0.40)
  • Restaurants (Childs Restaurants)
  • $0.25 – Breakfast
  • Restaurants (Childs Restaurants) $1.00 (each) – Dinner (Fried Oysters)
  • Hotdog Lunches – $0.40
  • Transportation – $0.20 (Nickel rides on elevate train)
  • Game Tickets – $1.00 (Each)
  • Lagniappe – $0.50 (Tip to Wino for guiding them to a box office with game tickets)
  • Theater tickets – $1.00 each to see Jane Cowel in Within the Law
  • 3 Cigars – $0.25 Unsure of this but could have been a Blackstone Cigar

Total $13.05 in 1913

Today’s cost breakdown:

  • Railroad fares for two – $102.32
  • Room at Mills Hotel – $18.60
  • Restaurants (Childs Restaurants) $5.81 – Breakfast
  • Restaurants (Childs Restaurants) $23.25 (each) – Dinner (Fried Oysters)
  • Hotdog Lunches – $9.30
  • Transportation – $4.65
  • Game Tickets – $23.25 (Each)
  • Lagniappe – $11.63 (Tip to Wino for guiding them to a box office with game tickets)
  • Theater tickets – $23.25 each to see Jane Cowel in Within the Law
  • 3 Cigars – $5.81 Unsure of this but could have been a Blackstone Cigar

Total $297.62 in 2011

The items in his detailed list are a great source of a bygone age, a quick look at them take us back to an age that the game was the biggest thing in sports, yet so much smaller than it is today. There are seeds of thing in New York that are gone, yet still there.

Tho get into town the boys would have had to take the New Haven railroad to the city, New Haven at the time was one of the centers of the Insurance business, The trip into town would have come to a halt at Grand Central Terminal, this would have been a treat as the Terminal had just finished a ten year rehab that made it the premier station in the country, if not the world.

The Mills Hotel was built as a Hostel for poor men and was a open in the evening only building, this was done to encourage visitors to seek work. Only one building remains and can be found on the campus of NYU.

During their visit their food was simple and designed for the everyday New Yorker, for dining the pairs choice was Child’s one of the nations first chain restaurants, they possessed a varied and cheap menu in a large and spacious setting, known for its cleanliest in an age of taverns and saloons, plus to this day you can still find their buildings in the city.

It’s a great testament to the enduring love some have for the game, a love that gets them to follow it, to chronicle it, to treasure it with memories and words.

It’s ironic that 100 years later both teams still compete on the big stage, as they both now live on the other coast and share a marketplace and still do battle to one up the other.

A look at a vintage baseball ticket

February 16th, 2013

Good Depression era artwork here:

This is what one of the of the tickets at Ebbets Field for the first night game looked like.

This contest was considered prior to its playing a landmark move, it was the first New York City night game in league history, and the market was ripe for nighttime baseball. On 6/15/1938 the game took place, one little issue came up.

Johnny Vander Meer’s second consecutive no hitter occured

Whoops.. as a kid I had a Encyclopedia Britannica Childcraft story book,with tales about Gandhi, Eisenhower and other icons in history. Oddly enough there was a tale about this contest and this it is one of my oldest “learnt” baseball history memories.

 

You can buy one of these. Unsure why you would, but hey what do I know?